Capoeira Salvador Brazil
Capoeira Salvador Brazil

Capoeiras Salvador

Capoeira Salvador Brazil
Capoeira in Brazil

Rua do Collegio #

Grand Mestre Grand√£o

Anschrift:

Lot. Vila de Ogum / sítio olho d'água s/n Vila de Abrantes

Camaçari BA CEP 4284000 ( Salvador Brazil )

Associação de Capoeira Engenho

Capoeira Salvador Brazil

CAPEIRA CAMP BRAZIL

The Capoeira School Engenho is located in Abrantes, a suburb of Salvador da Bahia in Brazil, just 12 km from the International Airport of Salvador da Bahia. The school has a partnership with an international hotel on site and offers capoeira camps, courses, training lessons and capoeira vacations.

Capoeira in Salvador da Bahia Brazil, right at it¬īs roots.

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Capoeira, in its most complete definition and formation, was born in Brazil. With the beginning of colonization, the Portuguese saw in slave labor an instrument for the development desired by them. They tried at first to enslave and exploit the work of the natives who lived here. However, the physical and cultural characteristics, coupled with the resistance to captive labor by the Indians, lead to their rapid decimation. The exit found by the colonizers was black slavery, the trafficking of black men brought from the African continent to the beginning of a great saga that marked the Brazilian society: the period of torture, the law of the chibata and death as regulator of labor relations . Black people began to live in slavery.

Capoeira Brazil / Already in the early sixteenth century, thousands of Africans were landed in Brazilian lands and, with them, the history of the country gained changes. Initially it was the labor in the cane fields, later in the mining and other productive activities. They were brought against their will, but they brought their culture, their living, and the seed of freedom that never died, even on the land marked by the horrors of slavery..

Capoeira Salvador Brazil

Every production of the colony was in the field. Thus, at first, the reports of capoeira appear as a dance practiced by the slaves, in the underbrush that grew after the forest fires for planting, called capoeira by the Indians. At this moment the practice of capoeira was predominantly rural, only hearing reports of it on farms and slave quarters, as a dance and also as a dangerous struggle for rebellion of the slaves. The black capoeiristas were feared even by the factories of the farms. Since the distances in the field were large, there were not so many exchanges of information, or parties that included slaves from different farms, only when they were sold to other owners or fled. These exchanges, when they happened, were important, for through them capoeira developed and became known among different groups of slaves. This fact confirms the affirmation of the previous text, since capoeira begins to develop with the union of the diverse African cultures in Brazil, made possible by the slave market.

However, these exchanges of knowledge among slaves grew, and through it slaves from different farms were informed of the escape routes for the Quilombos, spread capoeira and made religious syncretism, continuing their traditions and mixing their cultures. The strongest influences were those of the black Nag√īs and Bantus.

The Quilombos are another important page of this story, one of the strongest demonstrations of the struggle for freedom and the union of African peoples in Brazil. They were hidden territories in the distant forests of the Portuguese captaincies, where the Africans lived again in freedom. There were rumors of new Quilombs and their escape routes. Usually these rumors came as the "Lord" called groups of slaves to transport the merchandise to the small urban center of the captaincies. There were big fairs, export trade, import, sale of slaves. It was at this moment that the Africans met their peers from other farms, exchanged knowledge, and at the end of the fairs made small parties with batuques, chants and the first manifestations of capoeira. And it was through the fairs, also so popular among the Portuguese, that the Africans met, uniting essential elements for the development of Capoeira in Brazil.

With the end of slavery, many Negroes found themselves on the streets without jobs, housing and food. Because they did not have another opportunity for survival, they began to plunder and steal, using capoeira as an aid tool. With this, the process of degradation of capoeira began, when capoeiristas came to be seen as vagrants and delinquents. In 1890, capoeira was prohibited by law, under penalty of imprisonment of 2 to 6 months, remaining thus until 1937.

The first three decades of the nineteenth century were marked by constant conflicts between police and capoeiristas, who used weapons such as razor and machetes. The capoeiras used the parties of the wide and presentations to steal, to loot, to fight and to rearrange confusion. Its main focuses were the states of Pernambuco, Bahia and Rio de Janeiro, where in the latter, the government's concern was great. It was the total extermination of the capoeiristas.

The creation of Capoeira Regional by Mestre Bimba (Manoel dos Reis Machado) was a very important step for the legalization of capoeira and the recovery of its value, because with it capoeira is now recognized as a national sport. On the other side, capoeira angola was Mestre Pastinha (Vicente Ferreira Pastinha) who continued to react to that "mestiçagem" and sought to affirm the purity of capoeira, spreading his Angolan style, trying to make clear the differentiation of the Regional style

Capoeira Salvador Brazil
Capoeira Salvador Brazil
Capoeira Salvador Brazil
Capoeira Salvador Brazil
Capoeira Salvador Brazil
Capoeira Salvador Brazil

Capoeira Salvador Brazil

Capoeira Salvador Brazil